Tag Archives: It’s Not Dead

Concert Review – It’s Not Dead 2 at the Glen Helen Amphitheater

It’s Not Dead 2

On Saturday August 26th, The Glen Helen Amphitheater in San Bernadino, CA hosted It’s Not Dead Festival 2. The first It’s Not Dead Fest actually took place in 2015, giving festival organizers two years to fine tune the event. This year’s festival offered better organization, and a kickin’ line up as well.

The festival had four stages this year — one more than It’s Not Dead #1. The main stage was named in honor of Mike “Gabby” Gaborno, who passed away earlier this year at the age of 51.

Gaborno was a prominent figure in the punk and Chicano scenes of Orange County and Los Angeles, most known for fronting the punk rock supergroup, Manic Hispanic. In order to challenge the white washing of mainstream punk culture, Manic Hispanic fought back by covering punk standards, parodying the song titles and lyrics to speak about Chicano culture. The passing of Gaborno was a great loss to the Latinx and punk communities in Southern California. It was incredible (and an honorable nod from festival organizers) to see his name memorialized above the punk greats that headlined the festival this year. 

Other stages included the Fender and Olympic stages — two tandem stages which provided seamless transitions between each stage’s alternating half-hour sets. The final stage, the Cuckoo’s Nest Stage, featured lesser known acts. Set up right at the entrance of the festival, The Cuckoo’s Nest acted as a sort of opener stage for the whole event.   

Line up and set times for It’s Not Dead 2.

In addition to the musical performances, the festival also featured a variety of art, apparel and craft venders, in a sort of open-air punk marketplace. It’s Not Dead also brought back the Punks Well Read Tent, which offered meet and greets, readings, performances, and book signings from punk musician authors such as Kieth Morris (Circle Jerks, OFF!), Bob Oedy (The Grim), Jim Lindberg (Pennywise), and Jack Grisham (T.S.O.L.).

Performances ft. Guttermouth, Mad Caddies, The Toasters, Buck-o-Nine, The Flatliners, A Wilhelm Scream, Buzzcocks, OFF!, The Adicts, U.S. Bombs, Voodoo Glow Skulls, and MORE

Upon walking through the festival gates — a rather long trek from general parking — we caught Guttermouth mid-set at the Fender Stage. Singer Mark Adkins exclaimed to the crowd, “Political correctness is dead!” before jumping right into “Do The Hustle”, a fantastically offensive tune bashing roller skaters which includes the lyrics, “You cum-guzzling fruitcakes, I hope you break your fucking neck!”

I grew up listening to Guttermouth, and I have always appreciated their dedication to, and dramatization of, brash, punk offensiveness. This was, by far, the most fitting introduction to the festival and the day’s events.

We caught Mad Caddies on the main stage next, a ska punk band that is know for combining many different musical styles and elements into their music. Although Mad Caddies don’t quite have the punk rock “look,” their 2 Tone+ musical collaging is the essence of D.I.Y. punk.    

In general, I loved the inclusion of ska at the festival. I got to see the Toasters as well, who I had been looking forward to ever since the line-up was announced. In one of my favorite sets of the day, The Toasters were just pure, carefree fun. The band opened with fan favorite, “2 Tone Army,” and the set also included my personal favorite, “Don’t Let The Bastards Grind You Down.” The Toasters ended with “Weekend in L.A.” even though singer, Robert Hingley, pointed out that he did in fact realize that they were in San Bernadino and not LA (“Well I want to go to San Bernadino, Spend a week in Paris, France…”).

There was a groovy circle skank train during The Toasters set, in place of a mosh pit. At one point a dad entered the skank train with his toddler daughter on his shoulders. You could track her bright pink bucket hat bobbing along above the crowd. As the pair were leaving the girl squealed, “I moshed daddy!,” and he replied, “You sure did, sweetheart.”

Heart melting material, right there.

San Diego’s Buck-o-Nine also played later in the day. Plenty of ska grooving for all ages! Indeed, Buck-o-Nine gave a shoutout to an audience member, Judy, who was at the festival celebrating her 70th Birthday. Judy was set to sky dive the following day. Hope she had a blast!

Being in San Bernadino in late August meant that it was a brutally hot day, with the heat lasting well past sun down. Two working water fountains were the only free water source, with 20oz bottles of water being sold at $5 a pop. Yeah, even punk festivals price gouge. Bummer. They were offering free samples of Rockstar Energy Drink, however. 

In a testament to the heat, soon after the Flatliners (awesome Canadian punk band!) began their set at 2:30, front man, Chris Cresswell, started to rub his eyes after one of the songs.

“All the sunscreen I’m wearing is melting into my eyes and I can’t see, I can’t see you,” he addressed the crowd, “But I can hear you, and I can feel you!”

While the sunscreen did impair Cresswell’s vision, it did not impair his performance, thankfully!

A Wilhelm Scream took a moment after their set to remind festival goers to stay hydrated.

“Remember,” front man, Nuno Pereira, advised, “Water is the first ingredient in beer.”

Buzzcocks performed on the main stage from 4:55-5:40. Their 45 minute set was packed with classics. And, as you can read in tHeARTofLA’s recent review of their show at The Roxy, the men are still rockin’ hard — although their vocal ranges aren’t quite as spot on as they used to be. We began to speculate just how many shows these dudes have performed in their 41-year career.

OFF! followed right after Buzzcocks, with Keith Morris immediately lamenting how messed up he felt performing directly after the legendary band, who he reveres with immense respect. Buzzcocks no doubt heavily influenced Morris, who is now one of the most iconic hardcore punk musicians of all time. 

England’s The Adicts also graced the main stage, performing from 6:25-7:10 to a hyped crowd. The band still goes for theatrics, and Keith Warren wore his signature white, Joker makeup. Warren and the band’s costumes gave the set a warped circus feel — akin to A Clockwork Orange — providing the aesthetic of which all those that know of the band are familiar. Near the end of their set, a pile of giant, whimsical beach balls were set loose from the stage, bounding into and bouncing atop the crowd.

For the most part, the festival ran impressively smooth. There weren’t any audio issues or speaker blow outs, and bands generally performed on time. In the only real mishap of the day, the band U.S. Bombs ran long in their set on the Olympic stage, performing almost 10 minutes into the Voodoo Glow Skulls’ allotted time on the Fender stage. VGS waited 4 minutes out of politeness, but cut their losses and started anyway. This was only really a problem because of how the tandem stages were set up right next to each other, which created an unpleasant clash of sounds. It was unclear as to why U.S. Bombs let their set bleed so far into Voodoo Glow Skulls.

In a pleasant surprise, Voodoo Glows Skulls performed one of the best sets of the festival and offered a counter to the Toaster’s mellow brand of ska. Their set was fast, furious, and abrasive with a touch of theatrics. They brought out a giant Voodoo mask for their chant, “WHO DO VOODOO? WE DO, FUCK YOU!”

Punk is supposed to wild, wacky, fast-paced and — above all else — fun. In my humble opinion, Voodoo Glow Skulls perfectly captured this spirit in their performance.

Voodoo Glow Skulls, who played from 7:30-8:00, were the last set on the Fender stage, with the headliners of the festival now only performing on the main stage.

Headliners – Dropkick Murphys and Rancid

It’s Not Dead 2 marked the end of the From Boston to Berkeley Tour for Dropkick Murphys and Rancid, who had been on the road together since late July.

Dropkick Murphys began their set in their typical fashion and a haunting Irish hymn with soft female vocals played them onto stage. The production value of their set was fine-tuned — the jumbo screen behind them broadcasted images of working class Boston men of the past, interchanged with various renditions of the band’s name to match the moods of the songs. While the band performed “Blood” — a single from their newest record released in January, 11 Short Stories of Pain & Glory — a lyrics video played during the entirety of the song. For “Rose Tattoo”, during which the band brought on their producer to accompany them on acoustic guitar, a montage of rose tattoos and Dropkick Murphys fan tattoos flashed on the screen.

Among newer songs, Dropkick Murphys also played “Citizen C.I.A.,” “Curse Of A Fallen Soul,” “The State Of Massachusetts,” and “I’m Shipping Up To Boston.”

During “I’m Shipping Up To Boston,” the second to last song, a number of women appeared on stage to dance along with the band. As the band started up with the closer, “Skin Head on The MBTA,” a huge crowd from the audience climbed up onto the stage as well, until the end of the set. Letting fans crash the stage during the last song is a tradition for the band, according to my companion for the festival, John, a Dropkick Murphys veteran who has seen them perform 6-7 times. 

For any hardcore long-time fan of the band, this was a good set. In their hour long performance, they managed to pack it full of songs spanning all across their career. Personally, being a fan of mostly their older stuff, however, I was a little disappointed. I thought they would play a harder/faster collection of songs, and I would have loved to hear more songs from Sing Loud, Sing Proud! especially.

Rancid closed out the night with a lively, nostalgia awakening performance. They opened with “Radio” and the first portion of their set was all classics one right after another, including “Maxwell Murder,” “Roots Radicals,” “The 11th Hour,” and “Journey to East Bay.” They then moved on to play a few new songs from their latest record, Trouble Maker, which came out in June. The band followed those up with even more hits from their 1995 record …And Out Came The Wolves (including “Ruby Soho” and “Time Bomb,” of course).

Tim Armstrong was sporting a vastly different look than how most fans remember him, with a big bushy beard. As someone who hasn’t seen the band in a few years, it was startling! I certainly enjoyed being able to sing all of these songs that I grew up listening to along with Tim Armstrong. Tim is an exceptionally important figure to me — Operation Ivy was one of the bands that originally sparked my love of punk, along with other late 80s-90s California-based punk bands such as Decendents, Guttermouth, Pennywise and NOFX.

It’s Not Dead Fest 2017 – That’s a wrap!

I think I probably saw the most Decendents t-shirts and Milo tattoos in a single place at once in HISTORY at this festival. This was a fantastic people-watching experience as folks from all over Southern California came out in their most impressive punk fashion. Mohawk spotting was exceptionally fun. Punks have a talent for keeping their hair nice and sturdy all day for a festival! Among all of the punk t-shirts, I did, however, spot one Jimmy Buffet tour shirt. 

Some pros of the festival: The stages were close enough together that it was quite easy to bounce between sets, unlike, say FYF, and other festivals hosted at Exposition Park. The closed off horse-shoe shape of that venue can become a nightmare for festival goers who wish to catch sets on the opposite side of the park. At It’s Not Dead, I was able to cruise freely between sets without the stress of missing any songs. In addition, bands performed seamlessly for the most part, and stuck to the schedule! 

A personal victory: I only almost stepped into one pile of puke during the entire event! Impressive for a punk festival.

MAJOR CON: I would have liked to see more (I actually didn’t see any…) female musicians at the festival! Women in punk are extremely vital to punk culture, and I felt like they were left out here. With so many male performers, the festival seemed unbalanced, and not in the true spirit of punk rock — which should act to empower people who feel silenced by mainstream society. 

It’s Not Dead 2 was an immensely fun, though at times unbearably hot, day of punk camaraderie. For many attendees, including myself, the bands that played were essential to inspiring a love for punk rock. People of all ages came out, and I could tell that some parents were elated to expose their kids to the art and culture which shaped them in formative years, and just have a great time bonding. I had a fantastic trip down memory lane, and feel a little more complete having spent the day near my favorite punks.

 

 

Image Gallery – Lagwagon at It’s Not Dead

Lagwagon
It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

 

get to know Lagwagon better:

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
BOUNCING SOULS
FISHBONE
THE DICKIES
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

 

Image Gallery – The Vandals at It’s Not Dead Fest

The Vandals
It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

What’s  a punk rock festival with out the outrageous flair of the Vandals? Check ’em out then go read the full show review here.

Keep up with the Vandals here:

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
BOUNCING SOULS
FISHBONE
LAGWAGON
THE DICKIES
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE UNTOUCHABLES

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

Image Gallery – The Bouncing Souls at It’s Not Dead Fest

The Bouncing Souls
It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

Here are some images we captured of The Bouncing Souls playing their set at It’s Not Dead Festival this October. Also read the full show review here.

 

Get to know the Bouncing Souls

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
FISHBONE
LAGWAGON
THE DICKIES
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

Image Gallery – The Interrupters at It’s Not Dead

The Interrupters
It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

We saw the Interrupters give it all they had on the side stage at It’s Not Dead Festival this year check out the image gallery. And read the full show review here.

 

 

Check out the Interrupters here:

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
BOUNCING SOULS
FISHBONE
LAGWAGON
THE DICKIES
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

 

Image Gallery – Anti-Flag, from It’s Not Dead

Anti-Flag
It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

We caught some images for the band as they performed their set at It’s Not Dead. And read the full show review here.

Keep up with Anti-Flag:

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

BOUNCING SOULS
FISHBONE
LAGWAGON
THE DICKIES
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

 

Image Gallery – The Dickies at It’s Not Dead

The Dickies
It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

 

The Dickies showing the crowd how it’s done at  Not Dead Fest. Check out the images we caught of the band in action. And read the full show review here.

 

Follow these links to hear more of the Dickies:

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
BOUNCING SOULS
FISHBONE
LAGWAGON
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

 

Image Gallery – The Untouchables

The Untouchables
It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

 

The Untouchables broke a cool ska groove at  Not Dead Fest. Check out the images we caught of the band in action. And read the full show review here.

Follow the Untouchables on FACEBOOK

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
BOUNCING SOULS
FISHBONE
LAGWAGON
THE DICKIES
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

Image Gallery Fishbone

Fisbone
t’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015

 

Fisbone tore it up at It’s Not Dead Fest. Check out the images we caught of the band in action. And read the full show review here.

 

 

Keep up with Fishbone at these links

Check out the other photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
BOUNCING SOULS
LAGWAGON
THE DICKIES
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/

 

It’s Not Dead indeed!

It’s Not Dead Festival
The San Manuel Amphitheater Fairgrounds
San Bernardino
Saturday, October 3, 2015
By Terry James

Punk Update 2015: Definitely Alive…and Kicking!

It's Not Dead
It’s Not Dead

In the 1960s, the music of the day spoke for America’s youth, and it seemed to say, “Hey world, I don’t get you!” In the 1970s, that innocence turned to disillusionment, and the new musical voice of American youth was punk music, and later its shinier cousin, New Wave. Now the war cry was more like, “F*** you world! You don’t get me!” That attitude was carried on by bands for decades to follow.

Some forty years later, the punk movement finds itself in a culture whose general statement seems to be “WTF?” But, rather than flounder in mediocrity and ineffectiveness, the punk scene of the New Millennium definitely has a pulse, and it is pounding. To prove this, Warp Tour promoter Kevin Lyman, put together an all-day festival called “It Not Dead” which rocked the Inland Empire this past Saturday, and its colorful title was fully in evidence all day long.

Beneath an unforgiving summerlike sky, a sunbaked crowd clung to patches of shade like tattooed and mohawked lichen on a desert rock, as a string of punk bands – new and old, upstarts and icons – lined up to give the pierced and plaid clad people what they want…great music!

With over thirty bands on three stages, it proved impossible to see every act, and as always happens at these type of events, you end up missing a fave here and there. Our first casualty, punk legends Agent Orange, who for some infuriating reason played first on a side stage while we were still securing press credentials. Grrrrr!

One of the early acts we caught was Fishbone, whose high-velocity frivolity, Addams Family bass lines, and sassy horns made it very clear that the party is still going strong at Ground Zero. Lead singer Angelo Moore may have lost some hair, but not one bit of his quick wit, vocal prowess, and saxophone sass.

Goldfinger was up next, sporting pop-slick vocals and a crispy edge. Their set featured a grab bag of pop, punk and ska; they even had the Reel Big Fish horns sittin’ in on a tune or two. Unfortunately tech problems left lead singer John Feldman mute for half the first tune and buried guitar and horns deep in the mix, putting the kabosh on what could have been a cool cameo by the RBF crew. Overall, though, the band was mean, meaty and mighty.

We caught a bit of Pulley’s set, and it was solid old-school slam, veritable veteran cool. Then the Untouchables arrived. Slinking in on creeping bass lines, they whipped up a ska swing fest with solid sexy soul and precision grooves, including classics like “I Spy,” “Free Yourself,” and “Wind Me Up!” Though they may have been one of the oldest bands on the bill, these gents proved that their sound is timeless.

CJ Ramone cranked out high-powered covers in the warm California sun and Total Chaos was a musical demon growling and scrambling for higher ground. Throughout their sets, we found ourselves frantic for fluids as we all but evaporated in the grueling inferno.

Then seminal punk paladins the Dickies strutted up to the mike. The rattled off rapid-fire 2 minute slices of whip-wire vocals, metal-tinged guitar and pure punk posture. Front man Leonard Graves Phillips was literally kicking ass! Their set included their smokin’ Sabbath cover, frantic flailing, weird-ass warbling, a pornographic dance with a blowup doll, a diver’s mask, hand puppets and hyper- violent pantomime. It was punk rock vaudeville, bring your own popcorn! Damn, what a treat!

Later, we caught the end of Reel Big Fish, and hung out in their happy hoppin’ horny hullabaloo. Lead singer Aaron Burnett was cracking the kids up with a musical bit where the band would play the same song in a variety of musical styles, Funny stuff. The closed with a cover of Aha’s 80s hit “Take On Me,” which had the whole crowd swaying.

Anti-Flag kicked of their round with a crowd-surfing Donald Trump piñata – it didn’t even make it through the first tune before it was decimated by the crowd. Aggressive, raspy, ripsaw riffs with shrill staccato vocals and gut punch drumlines define this band’s powerful sound, with lyrics decrying pervasive corporatism and rampant greed. Despite their nihilistic overtones, a surprisingly hopeful streak ran through their set, as front man Justin Sane declared “punk rock isn’t about records or t-shirts its about empathy… Yeah, you’ve got ink, but you also have a heart. So everyone make a new friend here today!” Couldn’t have said it better myself.

We wandered back over to the side stage to catch the Interruptors. These new kids were all black-and-white skinny tie supercharged ska. Their frantic energy and fun-fueled tunes got the sun-drenched crowd moshing and skanking. You can lead or you can follow, but all you are is white noise to me….

Seasoned pros TSOL assaulted the crowd with their signature brand of musical mayhem, highlighted by the roar of Joe Wood’s relentless guitar and Greg Kuehns Phantom of the Opera b3 riffs. Lead singer Jack Grisham berated crowd for throwing half full beers, “If you can’t drink like an alcoholic you might as well go the f*** home right now! That’s like having a mohawk on the weekends and combing it flat on Monday! Unreal! Never let go of the beverage!” With all the mojo on display, this was definitely a mainstage act crammed on a side stage!

As the sun sank behind the scorched Southland hills, Less Than Jake dropped a finely-tuned set of jams punctuated by their punchy horn section and clever lyrically-driven tunes. Bouncing Souls stepped up next and did all they could to deliver their best despite finding themselves on a main stage that had been plagued with sound problems all day. I’m willing to forgive a misstep here or there, but from a purely technically standpoint, this end of the venue was an unforgivable fustercluck the entire day. Eventually things came together and it was on! Lead singer Greg Attonito encouraged the crowd to chant along to their anarchic anthems. Hold on to what you got!

The Vandals stormed the stage next, bringing along their peculiar breed of silly-serious snark. Machine gun lyrics combined with wicked guitar worked to produce a witches brew of wonderful wonk. Solidly self-effacing and sarcastic, culminating in a spastic rendition of Queen’s “Don’t Stop Me Now” for an “encore” delivered to the crowds delight by guitarist Warren Fitzgerald. Great set!

A clever but somewhat annoying element was introduced by spinning the wheel to determine the next band. Round and round it went…

Next up – Lagwagon. Classic hammered-metal punk with an emotive drone. This is the music of the desperate and futile, lashing out at the heartless and cruel. Hardcore heartbreak. The Wheel o’ Punk served up the Descendants next. Their affable front man Milo Aukerman quipped his way through a set replete with hits like “Everything Sucks” and “If Only.” This time-tested team cranked good and hard, and delivered the quote of the day, “Thou shalt not commit adulthood!”

With things beginning to cool down atmospherically, the crowd had begun to recover from sunstroke and were now fueling up on cheap beer for the promise of full on fun to come. The Dial of Doom dropped NOFX in the laps of a crowd that was well into its second, or third, wind and ready to party! Sporting a kilt and an appropriate punk attitude, bassist Fat Mike traded quips with guitarist extraordinaire El Hefe, as this perennial favorite gave us just the high-energy shot in the arm we needed to get through what had turned out to be a very long, but jam-packed day. Their tunes ran the gamut from reggae-infused jam to straight-ahead punk slam. Oy! Oy! Oy!

As the revolving stage of It’s Not Dead rotated to the strains of Jesus Christ Superstar, lo it was revealed unto us, bathed in red light, the glory of Bad Religion. Crushing it in fine form, this bands’ band reminded everyone just what we were here for. Pure power. These punk prophets came out strong and only got stronger as their set progressed. Firing off each bite-sized beauty like tommygun rounds into the all-too receptive brains of the appreciative masses. My personal favorites: the Celtic-tinged “Build Me Up,” anger-driven “Against the Grain,” the downward-spiral wail “52 seconds,” and of course their monster hits “21st Century Digital Boy” and “You and Me.”

To cap off the evening punk powerhouse Pennywise was prepared to deliver, but once again the curse of the mainstage struck as, apparently, the giant turntable refused to revolve. Impatient fans were treated to 25 minutes of watching Bad Religion’s roadies clear their gear before Fletcher Dragge even got to strike his first chord. The road crew actually had to scramble to drag the Pennywise show to the other side of the stage so things could get underway.

Once things got moving, and after dealing with the umpteenth microphone fail of the day. Jim Lindberg and the boys proved that they were worth waiting for, as they proceeded to dive head first into a breathless set of hard-edged insanity spanning the length and breadth of their repertoire. Dogged fans who stuck it out to the end were treated to one almighty body slam of a show.

If It’s Not Dead is any true measure of the state of the American punk movement, we have nothing to fear. The vigor and vinegar pumping through the capacity crowd were evidence of a life force that is anything but flagging. Nope, Punk ain’t dead…not even close!

Check out the photo galleries from the show

ANTI-FLAG
BOUNCING SOULS
FISHBONE
LAGWAGON
THE DICKIES
THE INTERRUPTERS
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE VANDALS

http://www.itsnotdeadfestival.com/